Some Views from the Roe valley

Map of the source of the Roe near the White Mountain. Fed by numerous small burns and streams.

The winding Roe as it flows into Lough Foyle north of Limavady close to Ballerena. The Donegal shoreline opposite.The viaduct carrying the Belfast to Derry railway can be seen across the mouth of the river. Derry to the left.

Image courtesy Jochen Lueg. Vielen danke.

The townlands of the flat plain of the the Roe north of Limavady. Note the townlands of Crindle and Myroe just above Limavady. The river entrance to the east towards Coleraine is to the Lower Bann river which gave the Vikings access to Lough Neagh. The outlet of the Roe to Lough Foyle is seen near Ballerena.

1930 view down Dungiven Main Street from the Glenshane Road direction.

Donalds Hill viewed from Largy School.
Image courtesy of M.Wack

Ruins from another era.
Image courtesy of M.Wack

This now derelict building is what remains of a typical small farmers homestead in the Legavannon area dating back to probably the early part of the 19th century. The remains of the chimney are still visible. The roof would originally have been straw thatched later after the development of corrugated iron sheeting the thatch would have been removed and replaced with this sheeting.This should interest those of you abroad who perhaps wonder what your ancestral homes were like in the Roe valley where so many of your ancestors emigrated from.

Weir on the river Roe near Limavady.
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

O'Cathan's Rock on the river Roe near Limavady.
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

Tranquility..
Image courtesy Claus E Mueller. Vielen danke.

The Roe from Burnfoot bridge looking towards Straw townland. Lower Drumneecy townland on right hand bank..
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

High summer scene. Benbradagh from Leeke townland..
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

St. Matthews chapel at Drumsurn.Opened 1901.
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

The ruins of Balteagh old church and graveyard..
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

The old Drumsurn chapel 1796-1901 after a clean-up 2007.
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

Note the chapel probably started life as a long thatched barn shaped structure on a rood of land (a quarter acre) given by the Marquiss of Waterford to the Catholics of the area and in perpetuity.The building would have been used along the long axis at the time. The altar was a slab of slate or stone supported by two stone piers.The floor was of clay with the better off worshippers such as the local O'Kanes and Mullans having wooden pews. Others would use slate kneling pads to protect their Sunday best.In later years the roof was of slate. The church cost 166 and 6 shillings to build.It was never named and was referred to as either "the chapel" or "Drumsurn chaple" It is interesting to see the headstones of the better of Catholic farmers and traders still in a reasonable state of preservation. Prior to the development of Catholic churches and graveyards the Catholics would in many cases have been buried in the Church of Ireland graveyards. The graveyard at the old church of Balteagh above has most certainly Catholic graves.Indeed some Catholic clerics are buried there in what is referred to as "the priests mound".

The font at the entrance to Drumsurn old chapel 1796-1901.
Image courtesy of the Webmaster.

If walls could speak!. How many of your ancestors passed this way perhaps in famine times or enroute for a better life in far off lands especially America.

St.Finloughs chaple at the Hollow Ballykelly. Built 1849.
Image courtesy of J. Mullan.

St.Finloughs chaple at the Hollow Ballykelly. Built 1849.
Image courtesy of J. Mullan.

Front view St.Finloughs chaple at the Hollow Ballykelly. Note year of build 1849.
Image courtesy of J. Mullan.

Historic St Aidans chaple Magilligan Co.Derry
Image courtesy of J. Mullan.

Front view St.Aidans chaple Magilligan.
Image courtesy of J. Mullan.